Leadership

By Jan Ferri-Reed

Great leaders lead by example, not just by their words and ideas. The most effective form of leadership is built upon a sincere desire to make a positive contribution – linked with key leadership skills. The desire to make a positive contribution is more of a mental framework or mindset. Rather than skill, yet it is a mindset that can be fostered and developed through effective training, coaching and mentoring. No one is “born” a natural leader, as some would suggest. Environment and personality style can create the illusion of a “natural” leader, but all leadership skills are learned.

Many leadership skills are learned by the example of others, such as our parents, teachers and others who guide us. Some are learned through experiences with sports, siblings and friends. Others are learned more intellectually in school, training programs and personal reading. Anyone can develop the mindset and skills of leadership if a true desire exists.

Those who lead best are those for whom leadership itself is not the primary aim. True leaders inspire others to see and act upon the positive values and priorities they themselves possess. More importantly, those positive values and priorities must be validated by the leaders actions and behaviors by which they themselves live.

True leadership is not derived from a title or position. It is derived from personal participation and effectiveness. To be a leader, be an example. Les Brown, a world renowned public speaker, says “In order to have the things tomorrow others won’t have, you must be willing to do the things today others won’t do.” Leadership at its best enlarges and duplicates the efforts of the leader. Make those efforts the best they can be, and they’ll result in true, effective leadership.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Jan-Ferri-ReedDr. Jan Ferri-Reed, is President of KEYGroup and provides businesses with insightful information to create engaged, productive and profitable multi-generational organizations. She is the co-author of the best-selling book, “Keeping the Millennials: Why Companies Are Losing Billions in Turnover to This Generation and What to Do About It.” To hire Jan, visit: www.KEYGroupConsulting.com or call 724-942-7900.

This article may be reprinted for your use in an organizational newsletter and or e-zine provided that you contact Kelly Hanna, Director of Sales and Marketing at 724-942-7900 to gain permission.


Ten Positive Behaviors to Help You Stand Out in Your Company

By Jan Ferri-Reed

In today’s business world, being self-motivated is critical for anyone to become successful. But, doing a great job and waiting for recognition won’t work. You must also market yourself and let key people know about your skills. Career development is in your hands. Your manager is there to support you, but you are the creator of your career mobility. Here are 10 tips for standing out and moving forward.

  1. Discover your expertise. Try new tasks that may not be of interest at first. You will create expertise through greater knowledge and experience.
  2. Strive to be the best. Invest in your own development. If you don’t believe in yourself, nobody else will either. Do this without being full of yourself.
  3. Take charge of the situation. Think about the “big picture”, not just the here and now. Try to get involved in the organization in as many ways as possible. A leader is a person who leads, guides, or takes charge.
  4. Look and act the part. Recognition takes time and practice. Model behavior of those you admire: dress more professionally, sharpen your language skills, etc.
  5. Engage others and contribute to the organization. Collaborative management skills are essential. Managers want people who are innovative and full of excitement that can add fresh ideas to the organization.
  6. Take responsibility for all of your work. Speak up and acknowledge your strengths and weaknesses; don’t just blend into the woodwork. Learn from mistakes. Apply the learning to new opportunities and challenges. Admitting to your faults shows that you are willing to learn and grow from them.
  7. Share minute details. Recognize all efforts– Part of being a star is the ability to recognize your supporting cast. Mention the accomplishments you are proud of.
  8. Celebrate the successes of others. Show appreciation for other’s accomplishments, organize celebratory get-togethers, etc.
  9. Be visible. Get involved in community services and events. Get to know as many people possible to build your network. People will soon recognize the true person inside.
  10. Re-imagine the possibilities. Take time to learn how to market yourself for your current or future career. Think outside the box!

Business success grows from dedication and incomparable excellence and/or service. Marketing your key advantage shows people who you are and what you are capable of becoming. Share your vision for yourself with others and let them be captivated by your motivation and drive.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Jan-Ferri-ReedDr. Jan Ferri-Reed, is President of KEYGroup and provides businesses with insightful information to create engaged, productive and profitable multi-generational organizations. She is the co-author of the best-selling book, “Keeping the Millennials: Why Companies Are Losing Billions in Turnover to This Generation and What to Do About It.” To hire Jan, visit: www.KEYGroupConsulting.com or call 724-942-7900.

This article may be reprinted for your use in an organizational newsletter and or e-zine provided that you contact Kelly Hanna, Director of Sales and Marketing at 724-942-7900 to gain permission.


What it Takes for Managers to Partner

By Jan Ferri-Reed

The underlying principles of partnering are:

Trust:
Partners feel comfortable with each other and know they can count on each other.

Respect:
Partners interact professionally and put personal differences aside; they focus on what the business needs from each of them.

Integrity:
Each partner must follow through on commitments and work toward meeting agreed-upon goals, milestones, objectives and deadlines.

The Ingredients of Effective Partnerships
Whether change occurs through solving problems or through seizing opportunities, partners can only be as successful in these activities as they are in their partnerships. Effective partnerships have the following three main ingredients:

  • Vision
  • Commitment
  • Action

VISION is a clear picture of what can be. It creates the forward focus necessary for an empowered team. It motivates people to act and fosters creative thinking. Without vision, long-term goals become vague and short-term goals are activity – oriented with little or no consideration given to the “big picture.” You can invent the future or let it happen by accident. You make the choice.

COMMITMENT is the internal decision a person makes when he or she says, “I see the need for this change, I believe in it and I will make it work.” It is a personal and individual choice. Research has shown that the more involved, informed and appreciated people are, the more likely they are to commit to the goal. Lack of commitment among coworkers will send any vision spinning out of control.

ACTION is the carrying out of a process initiated by clear vision and supported and developed through solid commitment. Action also involves the planning, monitoring and adjusting is necessary to keep the vision in sight and to ensure that all efforts are directed toward it.

As a manager, you are in a position to create an environment where people feel appreciated and valued for what they do and who they are. Therefore, they are more willing to commit to the vision and take action to make the vision a reality.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Jan-Ferri-ReedDr. Jan Ferri-Reed, is President of KEYGroup and provides businesses with insightful information to create engaged, productive and profitable multi-generational organizations. She is the co-author of the best-selling book, “Keeping the Millennials: Why Companies Are Losing Billions in Turnover to This Generation and What to Do About It.” To hire Jan, visit: www.KEYGroupConsulting.com or call 724-942-7900.

This article may be reprinted for your use in an organizational newsletter and or e-zine provided that you contact Kelly Hanna, Director of Sales and Marketing at 724-942-7900 to gain permission.


Getting a Pulse on Employee Satisfaction: When and How to Survey Your Employees

If you answered honestly, how would you respond to these questions: How do your employees feel about their jobs? Are they satisfied? What would they change if given the option? A Gallup Poll survey suggested that “78% of Americans think interesting work is a key element to job satisfaction, but only 41% think their jobs are interesting.” According to a survey done by United Directories, Inc. (the Business to Business Yellow Pages) of 3,500 senior executives, “76% said they were actively seeking new employment…58% said they had been offered at least one job during the past year.” It is time to deliver an employee satisfaction survey to your employees, when any one of the following situations occurs at your company:

  1. As economic conditions improve, job competitiveness increases. When that competitiveness seeps into your organization, it is necessary to stay in touch with your employees to retain the talent you want to keep.
  2. When your organization is undergoing a major change, such as reorganization, a growth spurt, or a change of leadership; it is important to check in with your employees to make sure they understand the direction of the company and to ensure that they are on board with the changes. It might also be a good time to evaluate how employees see themselves fitting in with the future of the organization and what they feel they have to contribute.
  3. If there seems to be a noticeably high turnover rate at your company, that is a definite sign that it is time to survey your employees to assess their attitudes and perceptions of their jobs, the company, their coworkers, etc.
  4. When you start to hear rumors about the company on a daily basis, it could be a sign of other underlying problems. This is a good time to survey your employees to get to the bottom of the rumor mill and to show that you, as a leader, are interested in what they think about their jobs and the organization itself.
  5. Lastly, when there are money issues occurring within the organization (decreasing revenues), it is your responsibility to be upfront and honest with your employees about where they stand. By surveying them, it gives the employees a voice and a chance to not only express concerns but also to provide ideas for growth and viability.

The survey process varies in scope, length and time depending on the organization’s resources. It is up to you as the organization’s leader to determine the kind of survey that would best suit your needs and the needs of your employees. The most important component of the survey is communicating the results to your employees once the surveys are completed. If you don’t give feedback to your employees, there is no point to doing the survey at all. Communicating the results and working together to develop a plan of action from those results are the most important benefits to be gained from the survey process. So the next time you are asked how your employees evaluate their job, their leadership and the organizations, you can answer with confidence, having employed the tools necessary to make a change for the better.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Jan-Ferri-ReedDr. Jan Ferri-Reed, is President of KEYGroup and provides businesses with insightful information to create engaged, productive and profitable multi-generational organizations. She is the co-author of the best-selling book, “Keeping the Millennials: Why Companies Are Losing Billions in Turnover to This Generation and What to Do About It.” To hire Jan, visit: www.KEYGroupConsulting.com or call 724-942-7900.

This article may be reprinted for your use in an organizational newsletter and or e-zine provided that you contact Kelly Hanna, Director of Sales and Marketing at 724-942-7900 to gain permission.


Coaching: Giving Feedback

By Jan Ferri-Reed

Coaching refers to managers and employees helping each other identify ways to enhance or improve individual and group effectiveness. This involves using active listening and positive response techniques to help each individual develop skills, leverage resources, acquire information and make decisions.

As a leader, you play a significant role in your organization’s future. Your assistance, guidance, direction, enthusiasm and willingness to grow could very well determine whether your team meets its objectives. Coaching will help maintain commitment in the workplace by helping employees:

  • Adapt to change
  • Acquire the skills, information, authority and resources they need to overcome obstacles
  • Develop and use their strengths and creativity

Recognizing Positives; Overcoming Negatives
“I never hear anything when I’ve done a good job but I always hear when I make a mistake?” Sound familiar? This is often the perception of employees when reflecting on feedback they have been given in the workplace. Leaders can change that perception by acknowledging and recognizing employees’ contributions on a daily basis. They can also take time to provide one-on-one feedback that highlights an employee’s positive performance. Unfortunately, many leaders spend most one-on-one time with employees in problem-solving discussions. The following model will help leaders conduct effective positive feedback sessions to credit employees’ positive performance and contribution.

KEYModel: Giving Recognition

  1. State the specific achievement.
  2. State why it was positive. Be specific about the impact on the team, goal attainment and the company.
  3. Ask the person to describe who or what contributed to his or her success.
  4. Encourage him/her to talk about obstacles that were overcome.
  5. Discuss how the achievement or behavior can benefit the team in the future.
  6. Express appreciation for the achievement.

Of course, at times it is necessary to give corrective feedback as well. The following model will help make the feedback process productive and non-threatening.

KEYModel: Giving Corrective Feedback
Use these steps when helping associates improve their behavior:

  1. State the specific behavior.
  2. Explain why the behavior is causing a problem.
  3. Give the person being confronted the chance to respond.
  4. Mutually establish the desired goal(s).

Decide on specific actions to be taken to avoid the problem in the future.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Jan-Ferri-ReedDr. Jan Ferri-Reed, is President of KEYGroup and provides businesses with insightful information to create engaged, productive and profitable multi-generational organizations. She is the co-author of the best-selling book, “Keeping the Millennials: Why Companies Are Losing Billions in Turnover to This Generation and What to Do About It.” To hire Jan, visit: www.KEYGroupConsulting.com or call 724-942-7900.

This article may be reprinted for your use in an organizational newsletter and or e-zine provided that you contact Kelly Hanna, Director of Sales and Marketing at 724-942-7900 to gain permission.


Common Characteristics of Five Top-Performance Companies

By Jan Ferri-Reed

What do Wal-Mart, General Electric, Bank of America, Nestle, and Hershey’s have in common? Besides the fact that all five are among the top one hundred profit-making companies in the world, these companies also have similar values that contribute to their success. While each company has its own unique bundle of values, three ideals stand out across the board: leadership, integrity, and teamwork.

Leadership is a continually evolving science, which is partly why it is so valued by corporations. It is also the most important asset that companies possess. The success or failure of an organization often rests on the quality of leadership within that organization. One example of outstanding leadership is General Electric. GE believes that “change is the essence of what it means to lead.” It is known for having one of the best leadership development models in the country. Part of that model involves moving GE managers and executives from job to job every two to three years, each change being a well-thought out process that provides GE managers with much-needed experience and exposure to different elements of the business. The end result is that GE is able to build a management core that is very knowledgeable and experienced in the operations of the giant corporation. The Navy uses this model in developing talent also.

Bank of America represents another example of exceptional leadership. Named to DiversityInc’s listing of Top 50 Companies for Diversity for the third year in a row, Bank of America is recognized for national leadership in every aspect of managing diversity, from sales and marketing to recruiting and retaining the best talent.

Integrity is also an important corporate ideal. Integrity represents honesty, honor, and reliability. It is the firm foundation of a corporation. It is important to all stakeholders: employees, suppliers, customers, shareholders, the community, etc. Nestlé’s core values, unchanged from the beginning of their company, continue to be fairness, honesty, and a general concern for people. Nestlé’s leadership believes that a company’s success “is a reflection of the professionalism, conduct and the responsible attitude of its management and employees. Therefore recruitment of the right people and ongoing training and development are crucial.”

Bank of America is committed to “doing the right thing.” One of Bank of America’s values is that every employee has “the freedom, authority, and responsibility to do the right thing” for each of their stakeholders, and for each other. The organization has a code of ethics that is consistently updated and improved. Leaders believe in hiring according to their culture, and creating incentives and rewards for associates who “do the right thing.” Furthermore, when it is called for, they don’t hesitate to fire individuals who breach their culture of integrity, “regardless of potential or performance.”

Teamwork stands for cooperation, collaboration, joint effort, and solidarity. It involves listening 80% of the time and speaking 20% of the time. It requires an appreciation for different people with different ideas, patience, individuality, self-confidence, encouragement, and leadership. Teamwork is an important value of Wal-Mart. Former Senior Vice Chairman of Wal-Mart Stores, Inc., Don Soderquist, comments, “’Our people make the difference’ is not a meaningless slogan – it’s a reality at Wal-Mart. We are a group of dedicated, hardworking, ordinary people who have teamed together to accomplish extraordinary things.” Wal-Mart employees come from different backgrounds and races, and have different beliefs, but everyone is treated with dignity and respect. In 2000, Fortune magazine’s Global Most Admired Companies list ranked Wal-Mart No. 5 based on characteristics such as leadership, and values that emphasize the importance of people and teamwork. In 2003 and 2004, Wal-Mart moved up to the top spot on the list.

Hershey’s is another company that portrays outstanding teamwork. Certified by Guinness World Records on June 25th, 2002, Hershey Foods Corporation launched a team and achieved the record of making the World’s Largest Lollipop. The lollipop weighed in at a massive 4,016 pounds and measured 62.8 inches in diameter and 18.9 inches thick! The colossal candy was created by Jolly Rancher, a division of Hershey Foods Corporation, to celebrate the launch of one of their new products, Jolly Rancher Fruit Chew Lollipops. Jolly Rancher Marketing Manager, Randy Hansen, commented, “We are very proud of the teamwork and dedication of our employees that enabled Jolly Rancher to break this historic candy record.”

All five of these top-performing companies have achieved great success, profitability, and growth through three common values: leadership, integrity, and teamwork. KEYGroup® recognizes these companies as ones characterized by a Vibrant Entrepreneurial Culture. These cultures encourage employees to be the best that they can be by modeling leadership behavior and taking risks that permit personal and organizational growth.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Jan-Ferri-ReedDr. Jan Ferri-Reed, is President of KEYGroup and provides businesses with insightful information to create engaged, productive and profitable multi-generational organizations. She is the co-author of the best-selling book, “Keeping the Millennials: Why Companies Are Losing Billions in Turnover to This Generation and What to Do About It.” To hire Jan, visit: www.KEYGroupConsulting.com or call 724-942-7900.

This article may be reprinted for your use in an organizational newsletter and or e-zine provided that you contact Kelly Hanna, Director of Sales and Marketing at 724-942-7900 to gain permission.


Ten Ways to be Prominent as a Leader

By Jan Ferri-Reed

Have you ever asked yourself “How can I stand out as a top performer and leader in my organization?” Top executives of organizations are always on the lookout for well-rounded leaders who are able to move the organization forward. According to Bill George former Chairman and CEO a medical technology company, Medtronic Inc., “Every great leader is at least three standard deviations from the norm.” Below are ten ways to reach your full potential and to surpass the norm as a leader.

  1. Get motivated: Motivation is the key to success. Find what motivates you and your work will progress. Ask yourself, “What am I passionate about?” Then create a working environment around your passion.
  2. Be optimistic: A positive outlook towards your career and life will affect your relationships with the people around you as well as your work.
  3. Be Ethical: In today’s world, especially with recent scandals, executives are looking for leaders who are ethical. Keep focus on your tasks rather than distractions. Your leaders will value you as a respectable employee who has integrity.
  4. Strive to be the best: Setting high standards for yourself and creating the most effective team will enhance your work ethic and determination. Doing your best work will open doors to advancement.
  5. Do more than what is expected: Executives look for employees that do more than what is expected. Take pride in every task and you will receive promotional benefits and other opportunities!
  6. Never stop learning: Taking night classes, reading books/scholarly journals and/or attending conferences will unlock new ideas and ways of tackling problems. Knowledge and wisdom will be an asset to you in everyday life.
  7. Pay attention: Reading the newspaper, watching the news or even researching your company will show that you are informed and knowledgeable.
  8. Network: Meeting new and different people will develop opportunities for the future. Talk to people everywhere you go, and you may find an opportunity in an unsuspecting place. Attend professional conferences and seminars when you are able and get to know industry professionals in your area.
  9. Be amicable: Take a little time everyday to talk to your colleagues and leaders. Your peers will have a positive outlook on you as a team person and colleague.
  10. Exercise and eat healthy: Exercising promotes more energy and confidence, and reduces stress. This will give you a better attitude towards work. Overeating can cause fatigue and laziness. With a combination of exercising and eating healthy, you will produce a clearer and healthier mind.

Personal growth will help you in phenomenal ways. Job advancement, wisdom and new experiences are keys to becoming a successful leader. By following these ten strategies, your career will advance in new ways. Reaching your full leadership potential is an obligation to yourself and your organization.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Jan-Ferri-ReedDr. Jan Ferri-Reed, is President of KEYGroup and provides businesses with insightful information to create engaged, productive and profitable multi-generational organizations. She is the co-author of the best-selling book, “Keeping the Millennials: Why Companies Are Losing Billions in Turnover to This Generation and What to Do About It.” To hire Jan, visit: www.KEYGroupConsulting.com or call 724-942-7900.

This article may be reprinted for your use in an organizational newsletter and or e-zine provided that you contact Kelly Hanna, Director of Sales and Marketing at 724-942-7900 to gain permission.


Five Ways to Achieve and Maintain Resilience

By Jan Ferri-Reed

With so many demands and pressures on us every day, it’s easy to feel like a rubber band. Each stressor we experience pulls the rubber band tighter and tighter until it finally snaps. However, if you are resilient, you can add elasticity to the rubber band, bouncing back after each stressor. What exactly is resilience? Resilience is the physical, mental, and emotional state that allows you to be ready to handle any unexpected things that come your way. When you incorporate these five strategies into your life, you will achieve resilience.

1. Eat smart and exercise regularly
When you are the most stressed is precisely the time for proper nutrition. Plan ahead for proper food choices and find ways to exercise. This may even involve walking a longer distance from the parking lot to your office or climbing the steps rather than taking the elevator.

2. Don’t allow people to sabotage your life
Identify the saboteurs in your life and avoid or set limits with them. Saboteurs may be friends that drain you with their negativity, or they could be family members that are too demanding of your time and energy.

3. All work and no play…
Find the time to change your environment and to do the things you enjoy. Play and relaxation provide a catalyst for creativity and problem solving with a new perspective.

4. Reward yourself after a challenge
Keep a positive goal in mind as you tackle those tasks you dislike. Reward yourself with a treat or a break.

5. You’re allowed to say ‘no’
While you certainly want to perform at your best and make a good impression on clients, co-workers, and managers, realize that you’re not “super human.” It is healthy to recognize your limits and to adjust priorities.

Increase Your Resilience Today
In order to increase your resilience you need to be proactive. Realize that if you are stretched too thin, you will experience burnout. Take care of yourself and you’ll feel relaxed, rejuvenated and ready to cope with the ongoing struggles and stressors of everyday life. The result will be a happier, more satisfied you!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Jan-Ferri-ReedDr. Jan Ferri-Reed, is President of KEYGroup and provides businesses with insightful information to create engaged, productive and profitable multi-generational organizations. She is the co-author of the best-selling book, “Keeping the Millennials: Why Companies Are Losing Billions in Turnover to This Generation and What to Do About It.” To hire Jan, visit: www.KEYGroupConsulting.com or call 724-942-7900.

This article may be reprinted for your use in an organizational newsletter and or e-zine provided that you contact Kelly Hanna, Director of Sales and Marketing at 724-942-7900 to gain permission.


Seven Secrets for Giving a Presentation that “Knocks Their Socks Off”

by Dr. Jan Ferri-Reed

You know the feeling. It’s that sense of dread that settles in the pit of your stomach. It’s a clammy feeling that envelops your hands. It’s that sense that somehow your designer shoes have been turned into a heavy pair of leaden boots.

You’ve just agreed to give a big presentation and you’re asking, “What have I gotten myself into?”

Even experienced speakers sometimes feel a flurry of nerves before a big presentation, so you’re not alone. But the pros also know a few secrets for giving a dynamic, memorable presentation that quickly dispels mild “stage fright” once they begin speaking.

Their overall strategy is to deliver a dynamic presentation that galvanizes an audience and leaves them “standing in the aisles?” Following are the seven secrets used by speaking pros that can make that strategy a reality.

Secret 1:  “Profile” Your Audience
You can’t wow your listeners if you don’t understand their needs. To begin, what are the overall goals of the speaking event? What outcomes does the sponsor hope for from your presentation? You need to understand who will be in the audience, what they may already know about your subject, what they want to learn from your presentation. Also try to find out as much as possible about the speaking environment itself. Will it be a large auditorium or a more intimate meeting room? Will you be able to use a sound system and PowerPoint equipment? Will the dress be casual or business? The more you know about your speaking environment the more comfortable – and confident – you’ll feel.

Secret 2: “Grab” the Audience’s Attention
The first 30 seconds are critical. You need to begin the speech by making a
personal connection with your listeners, which demonstrates that you understand their needs.  An anecdote or personal example may prove effective. Some speakers like to use attention-grabbing stories and facts. When you start strong you signal the audience that a strong presentation is coming.

Secret 3:  Sell It, Don’t tell It
Strictly informational speeches tend to be boring. The persuasive format presents the content as a way of solving a problem or achieving a goal. It transforms your speech content from a subject that is “nice to know” (maybe) to a subject that the audience “needs” to know.

Secret 4:  Make It Colorful
Don’t go overboard with the“facts and figures.” That’s the sure sign of a potentially drab presentation. In addition to personal anecdotes and stories, pepper your presentation with famous quotes, “fun facts” and props to help hold their interest.

Secret 5:  Animate Yourself!
Professional speakers know that small gestures and monotone deliveries tend to get lost, particularly with larger audiences. Learn to use vocal variety — volume or tone of voice — and body language to add interest to your presentation. You should try a variety of delivery techniques and rehearse frequently, possibly using video. The camera adds a powerful learning dimension to rehearsals and we all know that practice makes perfect.

Secret 6:  Engage Your Audience
Try to avoid talking “at” your audience or speaking over their heads. You can use rhetorical questions to keep listeners thinking about how your topic relates to them. Another professional technique is to take audience polls and use interactive activities to keep listeners involved throughout your presentation.

Secret 7:  Close with a Bang
Audiences tend to remember presentations that end on a powerful note. Start by giving them a succinct summary of what you told them – tied to your presentation introduction – and make a strong call for audience action. Remember … this isn’t just a passive information session. You should always try to compel your audience to put your information into action.

Also, professionals know that most audiences are on the speaker’s side from the very beginning. No one wants to be bored listening to a dull, seemingly endless presentation. And you don’t want your audience feedback forms coming back with mediocre comments on the value of the presentation.

When you approach a speaking opportunity with the goal of “Knocking their socks off” and you work hard to relate your content to the audience’s needs, you’ll not only gain a round of enthusiastic applause, you’ll be providing timely and important content delivered with enthusiasm, style and impact. That’s a win-win for everybody!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Jan-Ferri-ReedDr. Jan Ferri-Reed, is President of KEYGroup and provides businesses with insightful information to create engaged, productive and profitable multi-generational organizations. She is the co-author of the best-selling book, “Keeping the Millennials: Why Companies Are Losing Billions in Turnover to This Generation and What to Do About It.” To hire Jan, visit: www.KEYGroupConsulting.com or call 724-942-7900.

This article may be reprinted for your use in an organizational newsletter and or e-zine provided that you contact Kelly Hanna, Director of Sales and Marketing at 724-942-7900 to gain permission.